Anonymous said: though, in the comics, it was indeed Thor who held Loki down, so his lips could be sewn (can't remember just now, if he see or not). I gonna try to find the panels online if you like. ^.^

thorkizilla:

batwynn:

thorkizilla:

batwynn:

rose-de-noire:

welcometotheoldworld:

batwynn:

Oh! Sure, if that’s not too much trouble. Now I’m curious.

Here you go:

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lzsvq4bk931r9f2g6o1_500.jpg

http://ladygeekgirl.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/tumblr_llxlgvdk9i1qbb60fo1_500.jpg (right before)

Anon didn’t mention, but it’s important to know that this is not a main issue. It’s a solo run, four issues all about Loki, that attempts to blend a little more with the mythology; they’re not part of the main universe (but nonetheless can be viewed as backstory, since they fit fairly well).

Yes, I’m sorry, I was in the tub and my app first off sends all questions on anon for some unknown reason, and, secondly, I wasn’t sure anymore if it was a solo run or main-verse. ^.^ 
So thank you very much welcometotheoldworld to clear this up for me! ^.^

-goes away to cry a little bit-

Further context is also really important for this story, though!

In those panels, Loki is ranting about why he’s so pissed off at everyone, why he killed Balder, how he gave all these gifts to the other gods, and the entire story is making it very clear that Loki is not a reliable narrator, so NONE OF THOSE THINGS HAPPENED.

On the page right after that, Thor gives it due consideration (because their lives are so long and because he’s genuinely listening to Loki, he’s trying to be fair) and says:
image

image
The point of that story was that Loki had (likely not deliberately, but still did so) twisted the truth because of how he felt, all the ways he was twisted around inside (in sympathetic ways, but he still was not seeing things clearly), that it was not what actually happened.

(It’s not canon to 616, iirc, though.  But still!  It’s interesting to discuss!  I really enjoyed those issues, they’re good for a Loki story, and they tend to get misquoted a lot, so sorry to barge in and all that.  :)

Ooh see! That makes a lot more sense to me, personally. Because Loki is poetic, and not often literal with his words. (As I see it)

A metaphor for his emotions, or an exaggeration for the reader to better understand how the situation felt to him.

(In probably way off. Ignore me.)

If you ever get a chance to read it, I do recommend it!  It’s a little more straight up Norse mythology than the comics usually go, but it’s very interesting and does a good job of making Loki a fascinating character! ♥

With this situation, Loki was being serious, he thought those events he described really did happen, which is why Thor gives it serious thought, why he’s really listening to Loki, but says, no, that’s not how it happened. When Thor calls him on this, Loki FLIPS OUT (as people do when their fragile web of self-deceit collapse under someone knows the truth) and you realize that Loki’s not very reliable, that he’s gotten so consumed by his own narrative that he believed it himself.

Which is a lot of what made him so interesting and kind of sympathetic to me in this story!  He wasn’t precisely doing it on purpose (imo—this part is open to interpretation, but it is presented by Loki as being true and he seemed to believe it himself, while the narrative points out that Loki’s version of things is massively slanted and often factually incorrect), but that he was so eaten up by jealousy and envy, he was so turned around by the intensity of his feelings, that he bought into this whole thing and believed his own stories.  ):

Loki’s response especially was amazing, and its a LOT of the themes I love in stories that are based on mythologies - especially the ‘villains’ who have to live those mythologies down.

(Loki #1)

The role of the ‘story’ and mythos associated with Thor and Loki lead to some of the best stories as well - Blood Brothers, which has Loki confront that he will ALWAYS be the bad guy, Kieron Gillen’s Journey into Mystery, which is about Little Loki trying to escape not just his reputation, and who he was, but also the story that wants him to again fill those malevolent tricksters shoes again… and then there’s this story, which has Loki tell Thor flat out that because people tell these stories about him, that makes it just as true as what actually happened.

aud-works:

loki, odin, & hoenir / by aud k
* * *
okay, so an anon asked:  I’ve always been curious: what’s your interpretation of myth!Loki’s backstory? Where did he come from, what sort of familial environment did he grow up in? How did he become a member of the Aesir?
sorry it took so long to get back to you!  i knew i wanted to draw something for this one but it took a few tries to get it right.  prepare yourself for a novel-length reply.
okay, so norse mythology is a hot mess when it comes to the beginning of things, and i tend to pick & choose my mythology anyway, so what i have thought on this topic (though i haven’t yet sat down & worked out a cohesive mythos of my own) is only very loosely related to the classic Icelandic versions.  mainly i draw inspiration from one book:  Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe: Early Scandinavian and Celtic Religions by H.R. Ellis Davidson.  you can argue about the validity of this book, but i enjoy it a hell of a lot, so i tend to follow its interpretations.
there’s this one particular passage that’s always stuck in my brain:
"In the beginning, order emerged out of chaos.  Formlessness before creation was not represented by water, as in some mythologies, but by a great abyss, Ginnungagap, which might be translated Gulf of Deceiving, because its deceiving emptiness was in reality pregnant with potential energy and form.  Ice formed in the gap, and embers of fire came into it from the realm of Muspell, the region of burning heat, and from these extremes a mighty giant was created.  He was both male and female, and his name Ymir seems to mean Two-fold Being.  Tacitus records Tvisto as the first ancestor of the Germans, and this name appears to have a similar meaning.  A race of giants emerged from Ymir’s body, and he was nourished on the milk of a primeval cow, which licked the ice-blocks to release a new set of beings, three brothers called the Sons of Bor.  These slew Ymir, and then formed the Earth from his body and the sea from his blood; the sky was raised aloft by four dwarves, creatures which bred in Ymir’s body, and then sun and moon were set in place and time began.  Three creator gods, perhaps the same as the Sons of Bor, walked on the seashore, which we have seen represented as the place of creative inspiration […].  There they found two trees, driftwood washed ashore, breathed vitality and spirit into them, and gave them movement, so that the first man and woman came to life.
"Here the gods are seen as the creators of the world of men, and of mankind, but the giants preceded them.  In the poems, the giants are seen as the possessors of ancient wisdom, since only they can remember the far-off beginnings, and even Odin turned to them when he wished to increase his knowledge.  We cannot be sure who these creator gods were.  In Voluspa they are said to be Odin with Lodur and Hoenir, two gods of whom little is known.  Lodur has been identified by some with Loki, who is often the companion of Odin and in some ways might be seen as a shadow creative figure, giving birth to Odin’s horse Sleipnir, to monsters, and to Hel, Goddess of Death.” [p. 173-4]
i love the idea of this creative trinity, though the fact that they’re all men makes me roll my eyes.  for me, there’s Odin (masculine), Hoenir (feminine), and Loki (both and neither).  (i’ve obviously been playing around with my design of odin.)  i haven’t connected their story into anything larger yet — i don’t know how odin’s court came about, for instance — but the image of these three siblings wandering the realms before hardly anything else existed is one that i loooove.

aud-works:

loki, odin, & hoenir / by aud k

* * *

okay, so an anon asked:  I’ve always been curious: what’s your interpretation of myth!Loki’s backstory? Where did he come from, what sort of familial environment did he grow up in? How did he become a member of the Aesir?

sorry it took so long to get back to you!  i knew i wanted to draw something for this one but it took a few tries to get it right.  prepare yourself for a novel-length reply.

okay, so norse mythology is a hot mess when it comes to the beginning of things, and i tend to pick & choose my mythology anyway, so what i have thought on this topic (though i haven’t yet sat down & worked out a cohesive mythos of my own) is only very loosely related to the classic Icelandic versions.  mainly i draw inspiration from one book:  Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe: Early Scandinavian and Celtic Religions by H.R. Ellis Davidson.  you can argue about the validity of this book, but i enjoy it a hell of a lot, so i tend to follow its interpretations.

there’s this one particular passage that’s always stuck in my brain:

"In the beginning, order emerged out of chaos.  Formlessness before creation was not represented by water, as in some mythologies, but by a great abyss, Ginnungagap, which might be translated Gulf of Deceiving, because its deceiving emptiness was in reality pregnant with potential energy and form.  Ice formed in the gap, and embers of fire came into it from the realm of Muspell, the region of burning heat, and from these extremes a mighty giant was created.  He was both male and female, and his name Ymir seems to mean Two-fold Being.  Tacitus records Tvisto as the first ancestor of the Germans, and this name appears to have a similar meaning.  A race of giants emerged from Ymir’s body, and he was nourished on the milk of a primeval cow, which licked the ice-blocks to release a new set of beings, three brothers called the Sons of Bor.  These slew Ymir, and then formed the Earth from his body and the sea from his blood; the sky was raised aloft by four dwarves, creatures which bred in Ymir’s body, and then sun and moon were set in place and time began.  Three creator gods, perhaps the same as the Sons of Bor, walked on the seashore, which we have seen represented as the place of creative inspiration […].  There they found two trees, driftwood washed ashore, breathed vitality and spirit into them, and gave them movement, so that the first man and woman came to life.

"Here the gods are seen as the creators of the world of men, and of mankind, but the giants preceded them.  In the poems, the giants are seen as the possessors of ancient wisdom, since only they can remember the far-off beginnings, and even Odin turned to them when he wished to increase his knowledge.  We cannot be sure who these creator gods were.  In Voluspa they are said to be Odin with Lodur and Hoenir, two gods of whom little is known.  Lodur has been identified by some with Loki, who is often the companion of Odin and in some ways might be seen as a shadow creative figure, giving birth to Odin’s horse Sleipnir, to monsters, and to Hel, Goddess of Death.” [p. 173-4]

i love the idea of this creative trinity, though the fact that they’re all men makes me roll my eyes.  for me, there’s Odin (masculine), Hoenir (feminine), and Loki (both and neither).  (i’ve obviously been playing around with my design of odin.)  i haven’t connected their story into anything larger yet — i don’t know how odin’s court came about, for instance — but the image of these three siblings wandering the realms before hardly anything else existed is one that i loooove.

crayonic:

For people who are actually interested in how viking music might have sounded, “Drømde mik en drøm i nat" (/I dreamt a dream last night) is the earliest music (and lyrics) known in Scandinavia preserved on the last page of the (~1200-1300) Codex Runicus as rune notes.

The song and melody is still known and used today in most of Scandinavia, as a sort of folk-standard. This version, deceivingly slow in the beginning, is presented as close to the original sound of the years 900-1000 as historians think they can come.

This song might have survived because it was a gigantic hit, like the viking’s very own “Billie Jean”. A total pop slayer that stayed around long enough for music notes to be invented.

The more you know.

(Source: culturenordic.com, via amberfox17)

harpguy said: Could you possibly explain your portrayal of the Disir in JiM? I can't find any mythological source that describes them like that, and I was just wondering what your design process for them was (you always seem to research everything so carefully, so I assume you've got some sort of source I haven't found yet).

For anyone interested in hearing some of the scholarly discourses and intertepretations on the subject, John Lindow had a section on the Disir in his book ‘Norse Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Heroes, Rituals, and Belief’

Read More

hyperb0rean:

Norwegian Brides (1870 - 1920)

(via umakoo)

(Source: crisolyn-uendelig, via umakoo)

umakoo:

Above are the Øye and Høre stave churches. We only went inside the one in Høre, because it costs to enter each church. Below is the Borgund stave church, which looks a lot like the one from Gol. I think the ornaments are supposed to be dragons. There were also bus loads of tourists at the Borgund church and of course it cost to even enter the church yard :P

The waters in the lakes are clear and there are lots of little waterfalls falling down the mountain sides. The mountains (I don’t know what else to call them?) are much steeper and bigger than they appear in the pictures. Idk why photos always make landscapes flatter.

There are also lots of long tunnels that go through the mountains. I think the longest one today was over 7 km, but there’s also one that’s over 20km.

(via kimmsauce)

stirringwind:


Thor’s grandmother and Odin’s mother, Queen Bestla the jotun sorceress.

also when young loki asked why he had dark hair whereas everyone else in the family was fair-haired odin was like *shifty eyes* “oh you took after my mother!” 
I was inspired by thor 2 to draw her, since we got to see Borr and Asgard seemed to be made intentionally a tad hypocritical. So it would be entirely consistent for Odin’s mother to be jotun in the MCU too-alliances don’t last forever. She’d be where Odin got his skill with magic from. 
In norse mythology, the jotuns and aesir actually intermarried quite a bit despite being enemies at times. the frost giants were supposed to be ancient beings intimately connected to forces of nature, in some ways more powerful and wiser than the aesir.

stirringwind:

Thor’s grandmother and Odin’s mother, Queen Bestla the jotun sorceress.

also when young loki asked why he had dark hair whereas everyone else in the family was fair-haired odin was like *shifty eyes* “oh you took after my mother!” 

I was inspired by thor 2 to draw her, since we got to see Borr and Asgard seemed to be made intentionally a tad hypocritical. So it would be entirely consistent for Odin’s mother to be jotun in the MCU too-alliances don’t last forever. She’d be where Odin got his skill with magic from. 

In norse mythology, the jotuns and aesir actually intermarried quite a bit despite being enemies at times. the frost giants were supposed to be ancient beings intimately connected to forces of nature, in some ways more powerful and wiser than the aesir.

(via ayonoi)

madam-b:

The Death of Balder and the Punishment of Loki

watercolour

(via kimmsauce)

eovinmg:

The Leader

Loki rules XD When I’ve read Norse mythology, I got this impression of who is the leader from those divine bros (the term ‘brother’ among vikings was used when addressing fellow men). So Loki was not actually an uncle for Thor, because he is only blood brother of Odin.Also, I think even in Myth they make an awesome couple.AN: All the jewelry and clothes I depicted were drawn according to the right examples of ancient Norse fashion from sources such as illustrations of Prose and Poetic Edda from the end of 19th and beginning of 20th century. I had an intention to draw gods, not some drunk vikings in wrapped in fur and leather. No, the gods are supposed to wear less warm clothes because they don’t need them, and more gold because they are the richest.
by Develv

eovinmg:

The Leader

Loki rules XD When I’ve read Norse mythology, I got this impression of who is the leader from those divine bros (the term ‘brother’ among vikings was used when addressing fellow men). So Loki was not actually an uncle for Thor, because he is only blood brother of Odin.

Also, I think even in Myth they make an awesome couple.

AN: All the jewelry and clothes I depicted were drawn according to the right examples of ancient Norse fashion from sources such as illustrations of Prose and Poetic Edda from the end of 19th and beginning of 20th century. I had an intention to draw gods, not some drunk vikings in wrapped in fur and leather. No, the gods are supposed to wear less warm clothes because they don’t need them, and more gold because they are the richest.

by Develv

(Source: eovinmygod, via kimmsauce)

"One episode in the sagas suggests that tight-fitting clothing was considered showy or ostentatious. In chapter 45 of Eyrbyggja saga, Þóroddur Þorbrandsson had been wounded in a fight. His trousers (which had feet in them) were soaked with blood. A servant tried to remove the trousers, tugging with all his might, but the trousers would not come off. The servant said that the Þorbrandsson brothers must be stylish dressers, since their clothes were so tight fitting that they couldn’t be taken off. Subsequently, Snorri goði looked more closely and discovered that the pants were pinned in place by a spear in Þórodd’s leg."

Hurstwic: Clothing in the Viking Age (via 3liza)

(via hellotailor)

Writing Research - Viking Age

ghostflowerdreams:

The Viking Age is the period from 793 AD to 1066 AD in European history, especially Northern European and Scandinavian history, following the Germanic Iron Age. It is the period of history when Scandinavian Norsemen explored Europe by its seas and rivers for trade, raids and conquest. In this period, the Vikings also settled in Norse Greenland and Newfoundland, and present-day Faroe Islands, Iceland, Normandy, Scotland, Ireland, Russia and Anatolia. [1]

Names

Society & Life

Commerce

Entertainment & Food

Hygiene, Health & Medicine

Fashion

Dialogue

Justice & Crime

(via lokis-gspot-deactivated20140624)

Anonymous said: Hi, so I don't read pregnant male stuff. So It never really occurred to me until I read the Thor is pregnant with twins snippet that you wrote (I think you wrote, maybe you didn't write it? Idk) and it just like hit me and maybe you know cause maybe if you write male preg you read it too... Do male pregnant fanfics tend to have the baby through the penispopscicle (tried to censor penis) or like by cesarean?? Or is there some other way that I just am not thinking of?

helshades:

artabria:

helshades:

lokiagentofhotness:

honestly i don’t read a lot of mpreg, but i think it’s usually either a magical birthing canal that happens or there’s a caesarean done? with gods tho i reckon they can figure out a way to have a child without either - i’m sure thor and loki will have some kind of a lightning sprite child that’s completely non-corporeal and so won’t require birthing at all! convenient god-stuff biology ftw!

Just to be sure, people know that Loki in the myths was a) not at all consenting to his rape by a stallion, and b) not in his Aesir shape at that moment? Right? Right?

Anyway. I don’t recall MPreg in the myths. There’s probably some dark sexist conspiracy underneath all that. At least we can all militate for the incorporation of a Young-Thor-gives-birth-to-a-shark subplot in the running God of Thunder. It’s still time.

I once read something about Loki and I have confirmation thanks to the Wiki (from Hyndluljóð):

"Loki ate some of the heart, the thought-stone of a woman,

roasted on a linden-wood fire, he found it half-cooked;

Lopt was impregnated by a wicked woman,

from whom every ogress on earth is descended.”

It’s from the Flateyjarbók! written around the bleeping 1390s! I mean, Snorri was already a bit dubious, as source material goes… but this is beginning to be terribly late for Norse mythology.

The two stanzas featuring Loki are amazing in their vagueness and their totally random apparition, too, but mostly the vagueness: there is no way to know if Loki was indeed “impregnated”, as in, he suddenly became able to bear children in his Aesir shape, or rather was morally impregnated by the woman’s evil spirits—wasn’t it Gullveig? I think it was Gullveig—who, the grammar is entirely equivocal on this point by the way, has probably birthed all the evil by herself like a true feminist long before she was turned into roast-beef by the gods. This is Gullveig we’re talking about.

The problem with old mythologies from cultures that had their libraries burned, or their mythologies sanitized before being written down is your pretty much NEVER going to get any PURE mythology. (Don’t even get me started on aztec mythology, and how much of my favorite stuff is NOT from the documents recorded after the conquest, but from similar mythologies in cultures that managed to STILL tell their stories, at least a little while longer, and that you have to build up inferences from shakey sources)

As we are discussing the many facets and stories and kennings that refer to events that are never explicitly stated that come to together to make up the modern mythology of what ‘stories’ there exist about Loki, specifically on the topic of pregnancy, these are all fair game. If we were doing research on to what was the exact meaning and mythologies that would have been told and part of the cosmology of ancient vikings themselves… well that would be a different story.

And yes, vagueness is part of why there are so many ways to read these stories. The story of Loki consuming the heart is not one that is ever explicitly told, but is basically part of a long aside/kenning that is ancillary to the poem. Loki and his children in GENERAL are something constantly up for interpretation. Some people interpret it as being Angrboda’s heart, some people read it as being Gullviegs. Some people question is Angrboda was the mother or father, some people question how exactly Loki was involved in the birthing of trolls and witches.

What is more to the point is that these interpretations have all been made, and are part of the myth canon vocabulary that people draw from, even if there are differing stances or views or interpretations of each.

No, comic loki is not myth loki. No MCU loki is not comic loki. But when people are creating their own story, without any claim of it being actually canonically factual, it can be fun/inspiring/an interesting study to draw on all these elements, braid them together, to create a story where all these things are possible. And mpreg is one of those things that is not surprising has been pulled time and again into those created narratives.

hedendom:

Galdrakver (‘Little Book Of Magic’)

The ‘Little Book Of Magic’ is a seventeenth-century Icelandic manuscript, written on animal skin and containing magical staves, sigils, prayers, charms and related texts.

It is known to have once been owned by Icelandic Bishop Hannes Finnson who was alive from 1739 until 1796 and known for having a vast library containing many volumes of magic related texts and manuscripts.

Full manuscript here.

(via ayonoi)

hughdirtydancy-deactivated20140 said: I was reading mythology earlier and it said that Loki was the lightning to Thor's thunder. Makes sense because they always travel together and are so buddy-buddy ^^ (they're also my brotp) im pretty sure Farbauti was lightning though, wasn't he? //anyways, I love your blog and your artwork is entrancing.

One of the translations I’ve often seen attributed to myth Loki’s father’s name, ‘farbauti’, is ‘cruel striker’. The lighting meaning, and the interpretation of Loki being associated with Fire is often tied to the meaning of both his parents names.

Farbauti (cruel striker) and Laufey (full of leaves(?) possibly)/Nal (needle) is sometimes interpreted as ‘lightning strikes a tree/pine, giving birth to fire’.

IDK if I’d call myth loki the lightning to Thor’s thunder, but he certainly does bring a ‘spark’ to their relationship. Especially when Loki is the element that ‘sparks’ their adventure in the first place.