stirringwind:


Thor’s grandmother and Odin’s mother, Queen Bestla the jotun sorceress.

also when young loki asked why he had dark hair whereas everyone else in the family was fair-haired odin was like *shifty eyes* “oh you took after my mother!” 
I was inspired by thor 2 to draw her, since we got to see Borr and Asgard seemed to be made intentionally a tad hypocritical. So it would be entirely consistent for Odin’s mother to be jotun in the MCU too-alliances don’t last forever. She’d be where Odin got his skill with magic from. 
In norse mythology, the jotuns and aesir actually intermarried quite a bit despite being enemies at times. the frost giants were supposed to be ancient beings intimately connected to forces of nature, in some ways more powerful and wiser than the aesir.

stirringwind:

Thor’s grandmother and Odin’s mother, Queen Bestla the jotun sorceress.

also when young loki asked why he had dark hair whereas everyone else in the family was fair-haired odin was like *shifty eyes* “oh you took after my mother!” 

I was inspired by thor 2 to draw her, since we got to see Borr and Asgard seemed to be made intentionally a tad hypocritical. So it would be entirely consistent for Odin’s mother to be jotun in the MCU too-alliances don’t last forever. She’d be where Odin got his skill with magic from. 

In norse mythology, the jotuns and aesir actually intermarried quite a bit despite being enemies at times. the frost giants were supposed to be ancient beings intimately connected to forces of nature, in some ways more powerful and wiser than the aesir.

(via ayonoi)

madam-b:

The Death of Balder and the Punishment of Loki

watercolour

(via kimmsauce)

eovinmg:

The Leader

Loki rules XD When I’ve read Norse mythology, I got this impression of who is the leader from those divine bros (the term ‘brother’ among vikings was used when addressing fellow men). So Loki was not actually an uncle for Thor, because he is only blood brother of Odin.Also, I think even in Myth they make an awesome couple.AN: All the jewelry and clothes I depicted were drawn according to the right examples of ancient Norse fashion from sources such as illustrations of Prose and Poetic Edda from the end of 19th and beginning of 20th century. I had an intention to draw gods, not some drunk vikings in wrapped in fur and leather. No, the gods are supposed to wear less warm clothes because they don’t need them, and more gold because they are the richest.
by Develv

eovinmg:

The Leader

Loki rules XD When I’ve read Norse mythology, I got this impression of who is the leader from those divine bros (the term ‘brother’ among vikings was used when addressing fellow men). So Loki was not actually an uncle for Thor, because he is only blood brother of Odin.

Also, I think even in Myth they make an awesome couple.

AN: All the jewelry and clothes I depicted were drawn according to the right examples of ancient Norse fashion from sources such as illustrations of Prose and Poetic Edda from the end of 19th and beginning of 20th century. I had an intention to draw gods, not some drunk vikings in wrapped in fur and leather. No, the gods are supposed to wear less warm clothes because they don’t need them, and more gold because they are the richest.

by Develv

(Source: eovinmygod, via kimmsauce)

"One episode in the sagas suggests that tight-fitting clothing was considered showy or ostentatious. In chapter 45 of Eyrbyggja saga, Þóroddur Þorbrandsson had been wounded in a fight. His trousers (which had feet in them) were soaked with blood. A servant tried to remove the trousers, tugging with all his might, but the trousers would not come off. The servant said that the Þorbrandsson brothers must be stylish dressers, since their clothes were so tight fitting that they couldn’t be taken off. Subsequently, Snorri goði looked more closely and discovered that the pants were pinned in place by a spear in Þórodd’s leg."

Hurstwic: Clothing in the Viking Age (via 3liza)

(via hellotailor)

Writing Research - Viking Age

ghostflowerdreams:

The Viking Age is the period from 793 AD to 1066 AD in European history, especially Northern European and Scandinavian history, following the Germanic Iron Age. It is the period of history when Scandinavian Norsemen explored Europe by its seas and rivers for trade, raids and conquest. In this period, the Vikings also settled in Norse Greenland and Newfoundland, and present-day Faroe Islands, Iceland, Normandy, Scotland, Ireland, Russia and Anatolia. [1]

Names

Society & Life

Commerce

Entertainment & Food

Hygiene, Health & Medicine

Fashion

Dialogue

Justice & Crime

(via lokis-gspot-deactivated20140624)

Anonymous said: Hi, so I don't read pregnant male stuff. So It never really occurred to me until I read the Thor is pregnant with twins snippet that you wrote (I think you wrote, maybe you didn't write it? Idk) and it just like hit me and maybe you know cause maybe if you write male preg you read it too... Do male pregnant fanfics tend to have the baby through the penispopscicle (tried to censor penis) or like by cesarean?? Or is there some other way that I just am not thinking of?

helshades:

artabria:

helshades:

lokiagentofhotness:

honestly i don’t read a lot of mpreg, but i think it’s usually either a magical birthing canal that happens or there’s a caesarean done? with gods tho i reckon they can figure out a way to have a child without either - i’m sure thor and loki will have some kind of a lightning sprite child that’s completely non-corporeal and so won’t require birthing at all! convenient god-stuff biology ftw!

Just to be sure, people know that Loki in the myths was a) not at all consenting to his rape by a stallion, and b) not in his Aesir shape at that moment? Right? Right?

Anyway. I don’t recall MPreg in the myths. There’s probably some dark sexist conspiracy underneath all that. At least we can all militate for the incorporation of a Young-Thor-gives-birth-to-a-shark subplot in the running God of Thunder. It’s still time.

I once read something about Loki and I have confirmation thanks to the Wiki (from Hyndluljóð):

"Loki ate some of the heart, the thought-stone of a woman,

roasted on a linden-wood fire, he found it half-cooked;

Lopt was impregnated by a wicked woman,

from whom every ogress on earth is descended.”

It’s from the Flateyjarbók! written around the bleeping 1390s! I mean, Snorri was already a bit dubious, as source material goes… but this is beginning to be terribly late for Norse mythology.

The two stanzas featuring Loki are amazing in their vagueness and their totally random apparition, too, but mostly the vagueness: there is no way to know if Loki was indeed “impregnated”, as in, he suddenly became able to bear children in his Aesir shape, or rather was morally impregnated by the woman’s evil spirits—wasn’t it Gullveig? I think it was Gullveig—who, the grammar is entirely equivocal on this point by the way, has probably birthed all the evil by herself like a true feminist long before she was turned into roast-beef by the gods. This is Gullveig we’re talking about.

The problem with old mythologies from cultures that had their libraries burned, or their mythologies sanitized before being written down is your pretty much NEVER going to get any PURE mythology. (Don’t even get me started on aztec mythology, and how much of my favorite stuff is NOT from the documents recorded after the conquest, but from similar mythologies in cultures that managed to STILL tell their stories, at least a little while longer, and that you have to build up inferences from shakey sources)

As we are discussing the many facets and stories and kennings that refer to events that are never explicitly stated that come to together to make up the modern mythology of what ‘stories’ there exist about Loki, specifically on the topic of pregnancy, these are all fair game. If we were doing research on to what was the exact meaning and mythologies that would have been told and part of the cosmology of ancient vikings themselves… well that would be a different story.

And yes, vagueness is part of why there are so many ways to read these stories. The story of Loki consuming the heart is not one that is ever explicitly told, but is basically part of a long aside/kenning that is ancillary to the poem. Loki and his children in GENERAL are something constantly up for interpretation. Some people interpret it as being Angrboda’s heart, some people read it as being Gullviegs. Some people question is Angrboda was the mother or father, some people question how exactly Loki was involved in the birthing of trolls and witches.

What is more to the point is that these interpretations have all been made, and are part of the myth canon vocabulary that people draw from, even if there are differing stances or views or interpretations of each.

No, comic loki is not myth loki. No MCU loki is not comic loki. But when people are creating their own story, without any claim of it being actually canonically factual, it can be fun/inspiring/an interesting study to draw on all these elements, braid them together, to create a story where all these things are possible. And mpreg is one of those things that is not surprising has been pulled time and again into those created narratives.

hedendom:

Galdrakver (‘Little Book Of Magic’)

The ‘Little Book Of Magic’ is a seventeenth-century Icelandic manuscript, written on animal skin and containing magical staves, sigils, prayers, charms and related texts.

It is known to have once been owned by Icelandic Bishop Hannes Finnson who was alive from 1739 until 1796 and known for having a vast library containing many volumes of magic related texts and manuscripts.

Full manuscript here.

(via ayonoi)

hughdirtydancy-deactivated20140 said: I was reading mythology earlier and it said that Loki was the lightning to Thor's thunder. Makes sense because they always travel together and are so buddy-buddy ^^ (they're also my brotp) im pretty sure Farbauti was lightning though, wasn't he? //anyways, I love your blog and your artwork is entrancing.

One of the translations I’ve often seen attributed to myth Loki’s father’s name, ‘farbauti’, is ‘cruel striker’. The lighting meaning, and the interpretation of Loki being associated with Fire is often tied to the meaning of both his parents names.

Farbauti (cruel striker) and Laufey (full of leaves(?) possibly)/Nal (needle) is sometimes interpreted as ‘lightning strikes a tree/pine, giving birth to fire’.

IDK if I’d call myth loki the lightning to Thor’s thunder, but he certainly does bring a ‘spark’ to their relationship. Especially when Loki is the element that ‘sparks’ their adventure in the first place.


"Going out instead of reading? My dear, when you were a child under my most dedicated custody, you’d think books were the best leisure activity.""So you’re saying that you don’t feel like having fun with me, uncle?"

"Going out instead of reading? My dear, when you were a child under my most dedicated custody, you’d think books were the best leisure activity."
"So you’re saying that you don’t feel like having fun with me, uncle?"

(Source: arteapot, via ayonoi)

mrhiddles:

Loki and Thor from Norse mythology, body pillow commission for captainjakecoulson!

All body pillows are currently on sale in my store for $50, including this one!

||Buy this pillow here!||

Body pillow commissions are open! (and on sale for $80 until the 15th of December)

(via mrhiddles)

kaimaciel:


LOKI: AGENT OF ASGARD #3
• Loki heads back to the dawn of Asgard to join its greatest heroes on a quest for an otter-skin of gold, the heart’s-blood of a dragon… and a certain magical sword.
• Meanwhile, Loki does not appear in this issue.
• Both these statements are, for once, true.

Otter’s Ransom
By Norman Sheppard | Published: September 7, 2013
WINTER HAD LOST ITS HEART.
Every day the stallions Arvak and Alsvid rose earlier to haul the Sun’s chariot across the sky, and quietly the snow pulled back from the valleys and plains of Midgard. Small choirs of birds sang and Odin, Loki and Honir were to leave Asgard and resume their exploration of the worlds.
Early one morning the three gods crossed Bifrost. Talking and laughing they spring-heeled into Midgard, and Odin and Loki had to stretch their legs to keep up with swift Honir.
Suddenly a late snowstorm assaulted the travelers. They shrugged their way through thick wet flakes that tangled and danced and spun and flew in every direction till that wild onslaught ended as abruptly as it had begun; the sun boomed through layers of shapeless cloud, filling it with fierce yellow light; and then there was only the orb of the sun, the expanding acres of pale blue sky, and the blue and green levels of open Midgard.
The three gods followed the course of a river towards its head. And in the afternoon, they walked up under a waterfall. They strode into the thunder, through the spray-diamonds, and stared into the maelstrom.
Then Odin spotted an otter stretched out on the scraggy bank not fifty paces from them; he pointed it out to Loki and Honir. The otter’s eyes were shut. Feeling blessed and rather drowsy in the afternoon sun, it had just begun to eat a salmon it had caught in the waterfall.
Loki pursed his lips. He bent down and picked up a fist-sized stone, took aim, and threw it as hard as he could at the otter. The stone hit the animal on the head and killed it outright.
“Well, then,” shouted Loki, struggling back to Odin and Honir with the salmon under one arm and the limp otter under the other, “what do you say to that? Two for the price of one?”
The three companions were all equally delighted: Loki at his ‘ prowess, and Odin and Honir at the prospect of a good meal that evening.
They climbed up the steep bank beside the waterfall and continued on their way up the narrowing river valley.
The sun had already been drawn out of sight, and it was half-way to dark when the gods saw a farm only a little way ahead of them. Smoke lifted from its chimney. They quickened their step and gave thanks for their good fortune.
“Can you give us lodgings for the night?” Odin asked the farmer Hreidmar. “We’ve no wish for a dew-bed”“How many are you?” said Hreidmar.“There are two others outside” Odin replied. “And we can pay for our beds with food. We were in luck today and there’s enough for everyone.”“For my sons as well?” said If Hreidmar. “For Fafnir and Regin? And for nay daughters Lyngheid and Lofnheid?”“Enough for everyone,” said Odin airily.Then Hreidmar nodded without much enthusiasm, and Odin went to the door and called to Loki and Honir.“Here we are,” said Honir.“And here’s our supper,” said Loki cheerfully. “I bagged them both with one stone.”When Hreidmar saw the otter draped under his nose, he stiffened. For a moment his eyes glazed; then he turned and walked out of the room.“What’s wrong with him?” said Loki.Odin shrugged. “A cool welcome is better than a cold night,” he said.“I’m not so sure,” said Honir.“No,” Odin replied. “You never are”Hreidmar walked down the low passage, punching the turf walls, and found Fafnir and Regin. “What do you think?” he said. “Your brother Otter is dead.”“Dead?” exclaimed the brothers, leaping up.“Dead. And what else do you think? His murderers are our guests for the night”Fafnir and Regin were outraged and swore to avenge Otter’s death.“There are three of them and three of us,” said Hreidmar, “so we’ll have to surprise them. Each of us must take one when I give the nod. One has rather a fine spear and might be better off without it; and one has strange shoes and could be better off barefoot; I see nothing harmful about the third. Ill use my magic – Ill chant spells to weaken then. I’ll sing a charm to bind them.”
* * *
Fafnir and Regin did just as their father said. The three of leaped on to their visitors, and the farmer-magician Hreidmar weakened their resistance so that Odin lost his spear Gungnir, and Loki was relieved of his sky-shoes. When the three gods lay on the ground, bound hand and foot, Hreidmar shouted, “My son, you’ve lulled my son. I’ll kill you all for vengeance. You’ve killed my son.”“What does he mean?” asked Odin.“Otter was our brother,” Fafnir said.“The finest of fishermen,” said Regin.“He had the likeness of an otter by day,” Fafnir said. “All day he lived in the river and beside the river.”“And brought his prey to our father.”“A supply of fresh fish.”“Our brother.”“We didn’t know this,” said Odin. “If we had, Loki would never have killed him.”“Dead is dead,” said Hreidmar.“We didn’t know this,” Odin said again. “Do you think we’d have come straight to his father’s farm? You must at least give us a chance to pay a ransom before killing us.”
Hreidmar looked down at his three visitors and said nothing.“I speak for the three of us,” Odin said. “We’ll pay as much as you demand.”
Hreidmar thought for a while. “That would be fair,” he said, “if you were to keep to your word. You must swear an oath — and if you break it, you will all pay with your heads.”
Then the three companions swore that they would raise as much as Hreidmar asked.
“All right,” said the magician, turning to Fafnir and Regin. “Where are Lyngheid and Lofnheid? Have them flay Otter and bring me his skin again.”
Fafnir and Regin obeyed their father, and then Hreidmar laid out Otter’s handsome skin beside the fire. “First you must fill this with red gold,” he told the gods, “and then you must cover it with red gold into the bargain. It must be wholly covered. That is the ransom for the death of my son.”
“So be it,” said Odin. And he rolled over until he was close enough to Loki to whisper in his ear.
Loki listened carefully and then he said, “Let me go for the gold. Let me go, and hold the other two as hostages.”
So Hreidmar untied Loki’s bonds and, with a snatch of a look and a jeering laugh that left Hreidmar and his sons and even Honir uneasy, Loki threw open the door and ran out into the night.
* * *
Loki had left his sky-shoes in the care of the magician and, in any event, he was in no great hurry. He knew Hreidmar had nothing to gain by killing Odin and Honir and everything to win by waiting for his return with the red gold; and he was not especially averse to the thought of mighty Odin and long-legged Honir lying for a while, bound hand and foot. He dawdled all the way across Midgard to the island of Hlesey.
There, Loki visited Aegir and Ran in their hall on the sea bed. “The gods are in danger,” he told Ran breathlessly. “Odin himself lies bound, Odin and Honir, and only your net can save them.”
The wife of the sea god opened her cold pale eyes very wide.“Lend me your drowning net. I can use it, and not to snare men but to save gods.”
When Loki had talked Ran into parting with her net, he left the hall beneath the waves quickly in case she changed her mind, and headed for the world of the dark elves.
Loki picked his way down a chain of dripping tunnels and through a maze of twilit chambers, until he came to a massive cavern. Its roof was supported by columns of rock thicker than tree trunks, and its corners were still and dark. A little light, however, filtered into the middle of the cavern from a vertical shaft in the roof, and showed Loki what he had come to see: a large silent pool, filled with water that seemed to spring from nowhere and flow nowhere.
Loki spread out Ran’s finely meshed net and cast it into the pool. He dragged it and pulled it up and there, furiously lashing and writhing, was a large pike snared in the net.
Avoiding its nasty teeth and the equally nasty look in its yellow eyes, Loki took hold of it. “First,” he said, as he gave the pike a horrible shaking, “you’ll change shape.”
“Change shape,” echoed the cavern.
Then there was no pike but the dwarf Andvari in Ran’s dripping net. Loki disentangled him, keeping a firm hold all the while on the back of his neck.
“What do you want?” whined Andvari,“You want,” said the cavern.“What I want is all your gold. Otherwise I’ll wring you out like a piece of washing. All your gold.”
“All your gold,” boomed the cavern.
Andvari shuddered. He led Loki out of that echoing chamber and down a twisting passage into his smithy. It was hot and smoky but well fitted out, and well-stocked with gold that gleamed in the firelight. The dwarf spread out his hands and shrugged.
“Gather it up,” said Loki, kicking a gold nugget.
Andvari scrambled around, cursing and moaning. He made a pile of discs and chips and splinters and small bars of red gold, of objects already made and objects half made. Loki looked at the stack and was well satisfied.“Is that all?” he said.
Andvari said nothing. He stowed the gold into two old sacks; it filled them both. Then, grunting, he dragged them across the smithy and stood with them in front of Loki.
“What about that ring?” said Loki, pointing at the dwarf’s closed right hand. “I saw you hide it.”
Andvari shook his head.“Put it in the sack,” said Loki.“Let me keep it,” begged Andvari. “Just this ring.”“Put it in the sack,” said Loki.“Let me keep this, just this,” pleaded the dwarf. “Then at least I’ll be able to make more gold again.”
“I have no need of more,” said Loki, “and I’m going to strip you to the bone.” He stepped forward and, knocking aside one sack, forced open Andvari’s fist and seized the little twisted ring. It was marvelously wrought and Loki slipped it on to his own little finger. “What is not freely given must be taken by force,” he said.“Nothing was freely given,” Andvari replied.
Loki shouldered the sacks and turned towards the door of the smithy.“Take that ring!” yelled the dwarf. “My curse on that ring and that gold! It will destroy whoever owns it.”Loki turned round and faced Andvari. “So much the better,” he said.“No one will win joy with my wealth,” shouted Andvari.“If,” said Loki, “if I repeat your words to those about to get this gold, then, Andvari, your curse will come to pass.” And with that, Loki turned round again and, with oaths and spells in his ears, made his way out of the world of the dark elves and into Midgard.
* * *
“You took your time,” said Odin. Honir said nothing; he looked rather fearful.
“Hard won and well won,” said Loki. He dumped the sacks of red gold in front of his companions. “And what do you say to this?” he whispered, showing Odin the twisted finger-ring which he had wrenched from Andvari.
Odin blinked, and marveled at its subtle beauty. “Give it to me,” he said.
“At last,” said Hreidmar as be walked into the room, followed by his two sons and two daughters. He nodded, and Fafnir and Regin cut Odin and Honir free from their bonds.
Slowly and stiffly the two gods stood up. They flexed their muscles, they rubbed their hands together, they looked at their chafed wrists and ankles.
“Well then?” said Hreidmar.“You must stuff the skin yourself,” said Loki, “or you’ll never be satisfied.” He emptied one sack on to the ground and the magician stowed piece after piece inside Otter’s skin. He filled it so that it was plump and taut, bursting from top to tail.
“Now we’ll cover it completely,” Loki said, opening the second sack and pouring another mound of metal over the marl floor. While Honir held Otter’s skin upright, snout down, Odin and Loki heaped the gold around it. They built Otter a barrow of gold.
“So,” said Odin, with the satisfaction of a job well done, “come and look for yourself, Hreidmar! We’ve covered the skin completely.”
“The magician walked round and round the stack. He walked round it again. He examined the gold inch by inch. “Here!” he said. “Here’s a whisker! This must be covered and hidden. Otherwise, I’ll hold that you’ve broken your oath – and that will be the end of our understanding.”
Loki looked at Odin and Odin looked at the twisted ring on his little finger. He sniffed and drew it off and placed it over the single whisker showing. “Now,” said Odin loudly, “we’ve paid Otter’s ransom in full.”“You have indeed,” said Hreidmar.
Still rather unsteady on his feet, Odin lurched across the room to where his spear Gungnir was propped up in the corner. And Loki fell on his sky-shoes and at once put them on. A sense of their own strength surged within them. They looked at Hreidmar and Fafnir and Regin with no great liking.
“Listen carefully!” said Loki. “That ring and all that gold was made by the dwarf Andvari. I only wrested it from him with his curse. “Loki paused. “And what he said I say; what he said will hold.” Loki’s voice was low and compelling. “Take that ring! My curse on that ring and that gold! It will destroy whosoever owns it.”

Odin looked at Loki. His eye glittered and Loki smiled crookedly. Then Honir took one step and was at their side. The three companions stepped out of the farmhouse into the welcoming spring air.

kaimaciel:

LOKI: AGENT OF ASGARD #3

• Loki heads back to the dawn of Asgard to join its greatest heroes on a quest for an otter-skin of gold, the heart’s-blood of a dragon… and a certain magical sword.

• Meanwhile, Loki does not appear in this issue.

• Both these statements are, for once, true.

Otter’s Ransom

By Norman Sheppard 

WINTER HAD LOST ITS HEART.

Every day the stallions Arvak and Alsvid rose earlier to haul the Sun’s chariot across the sky, and quietly the snow pulled back from the valleys and plains of Midgard. Small choirs of birds sang and Odin, Loki and Honir were to leave Asgard and resume their exploration of the worlds.

Early one morning the three gods crossed Bifrost. Talking and laughing they spring-heeled into Midgard, and Odin and Loki had to stretch their legs to keep up with swift Honir.

Suddenly a late snowstorm assaulted the travelers. They shrugged their way through thick wet flakes that tangled and danced and spun and flew in every direction till that wild onslaught ended as abruptly as it had begun; the sun boomed through layers of shapeless cloud, filling it with fierce yellow light; and then there was only the orb of the sun, the expanding acres of pale blue sky, and the blue and green levels of open Midgard.

The three gods followed the course of a river towards its head. And in the afternoon, they walked up under a waterfall. They strode into the thunder, through the spray-diamonds, and stared into the maelstrom.

Then Odin spotted an otter stretched out on the scraggy bank not fifty paces from them; he pointed it out to Loki and Honir. The otter’s eyes were shut. Feeling blessed and rather drowsy in the afternoon sun, it had just begun to eat a salmon it had caught in the waterfall.

Loki pursed his lips. He bent down and picked up a fist-sized stone, took aim, and threw it as hard as he could at the otter. The stone hit the animal on the head and killed it outright.

“Well, then,” shouted Loki, struggling back to Odin and Honir with the salmon under one arm and the limp otter under the other, “what do you say to that? Two for the price of one?”

The three companions were all equally delighted: Loki at his ‘ prowess, and Odin and Honir at the prospect of a good meal that evening.

They climbed up the steep bank beside the waterfall and continued on their way up the narrowing river valley.

The sun had already been drawn out of sight, and it was half-way to dark when the gods saw a farm only a little way ahead of them. Smoke lifted from its chimney. They quickened their step and gave thanks for their good fortune.

Hreidmar“Can you give us lodgings for the night?” Odin asked the farmer Hreidmar. “We’ve no wish for a dew-bed”
“How many are you?” said Hreidmar.
“There are two others outside” Odin replied. “And we can pay for our beds with food. We were in luck today and there’s enough for everyone.”
“For my sons as well?” said If Hreidmar. “For Fafnir and Regin? And for nay daughters Lyngheid and Lofnheid?”
“Enough for everyone,” said Odin airily.
Then Hreidmar nodded without much enthusiasm, and Odin went to the door and called to Loki and Honir.
“Here we are,” said Honir.
“And here’s our supper,” said Loki cheerfully. “I bagged them both with one stone.”
When Hreidmar saw the otter draped under his nose, he stiffened. For a moment his eyes glazed; then he turned and walked out of the room.
“What’s wrong with him?” said Loki.
Odin shrugged. “A cool welcome is better than a cold night,” he said.
“I’m not so sure,” said Honir.
“No,” Odin replied. “You never are”
Hreidmar walked down the low passage, punching the turf walls, and found Fafnir and Regin. “What do you think?” he said. “Your brother Otter is dead.”
“Dead?” exclaimed the brothers, leaping up.
“Dead. And what else do you think? His murderers are our guests for the night”
Fafnir and Regin were outraged and swore to avenge Otter’s death.
“There are three of them and three of us,” said Hreidmar, “so we’ll have to surprise them. Each of us must take one when I give the nod. One has rather a fine spear and might be better off without it; and one has strange shoes and could be better off barefoot; I see nothing harmful about the third. Ill use my magic – Ill chant spells to weaken then. I’ll sing a charm to bind them.”

* * *

Fafnir and Regin did just as their father said. The three of leaped on to their visitors, and the farmer-magician Hreidmar weakened their resistance so that Odin lost his spear Gungnir, and Loki was relieved of his sky-shoes. When the three gods lay on the ground, bound hand and foot, Hreidmar shouted, “My son, you’ve lulled my son. I’ll kill you all for vengeance. You’ve killed my son.”
“What does he mean?” asked Odin.
“Otter was our brother,” Fafnir said.
“The finest of fishermen,” said Regin.
“He had the likeness of an otter by day,” Fafnir said. “All day he lived in the river and beside the river.”
“And brought his prey to our father.”
“A supply of fresh fish.”
“Our brother.”
“We didn’t know this,” said Odin. “If we had, Loki would never have killed him.”
“Dead is dead,” said Hreidmar.
“We didn’t know this,” Odin said again. “Do you think we’d have come straight to his father’s farm? You must at least give us a chance to pay a ransom before killing us.”

Hreidmar looked down at his three visitors and said nothing.
“I speak for the three of us,” Odin said. “We’ll pay as much as you demand.”

Hreidmar thought for a while. “That would be fair,” he said, “if you were to keep to your word. You must swear an oath — and if you break it, you will all pay with your heads.”

Then the three companions swore that they would raise as much as Hreidmar asked.

“All right,” said the magician, turning to Fafnir and Regin. “Where are Lyngheid and Lofnheid? Have them flay Otter and bring me his skin again.”

Fafnir and Regin obeyed their father, and then Hreidmar laid out Otter’s handsome skin beside the fire. “First you must fill this with red gold,” he told the gods, “and then you must cover it with red gold into the bargain. It must be wholly covered. That is the ransom for the death of my son.”

“So be it,” said Odin. And he rolled over until he was close enough to Loki to whisper in his ear.

Loki listened carefully and then he said, “Let me go for the gold. Let me go, and hold the other two as hostages.”

So Hreidmar untied Loki’s bonds and, with a snatch of a look and a jeering laugh that left Hreidmar and his sons and even Honir uneasy, Loki threw open the door and ran out into the night.

* * *

Loki had left his sky-shoes in the care of the magician and, in any event, he was in no great hurry. He knew Hreidmar had nothing to gain by killing Odin and Honir and everything to win by waiting for his return with the red gold; and he was not especially averse to the thought of mighty Odin and long-legged Honir lying for a while, bound hand and foot. He dawdled all the way across Midgard to the island of Hlesey.

There, Loki visited Aegir and Ran in their hall on the sea bed. “The gods are in danger,” he told Ran breathlessly. “Odin himself lies bound, Odin and Honir, and only your net can save them.”

The wife of the sea god opened her cold pale eyes very wide.
“Lend me your drowning net. I can use it, and not to snare men but to save gods.”

When Loki had talked Ran into parting with her net, he left the hall beneath the waves quickly in case she changed her mind, and headed for the world of the dark elves.

Loki picked his way down a chain of dripping tunnels and through a maze of twilit chambers, until he came to a massive cavern. Its roof was supported by columns of rock thicker than tree trunks, and its corners were still and dark. A little light, however, filtered into the middle of the cavern from a vertical shaft in the roof, and showed Loki what he had come to see: a large silent pool, filled with water that seemed to spring from nowhere and flow nowhere.

Loki spread out Ran’s finely meshed net and cast it into the pool. He dragged it and pulled it up and there, furiously lashing and writhing, was a large pike snared in the net.

Avoiding its nasty teeth and the equally nasty look in its yellow eyes, Loki took hold of it. “First,” he said, as he gave the pike a horrible shaking, “you’ll change shape.”

“Change shape,” echoed the cavern.

andvariThen there was no pike but the dwarf Andvari in Ran’s dripping net. Loki disentangled him, keeping a firm hold all the while on the back of his neck.

“What do you want?” whined Andvari,
“You want,” said the cavern.
“What I want is all your gold. Otherwise I’ll wring you out like a piece of washing. All your gold.”

“All your gold,” boomed the cavern.

Andvari shuddered. He led Loki out of that echoing chamber and down a twisting passage into his smithy. It was hot and smoky but well fitted out, and well-stocked with gold that gleamed in the firelight. The dwarf spread out his hands and shrugged.

“Gather it up,” said Loki, kicking a gold nugget.

Andvari scrambled around, cursing and moaning. He made a pile of discs and chips and splinters and small bars of red gold, of objects already made and objects half made. Loki looked at the stack and was well satisfied.
“Is that all?” he said.

Andvari said nothing. He stowed the gold into two old sacks; it filled them both. Then, grunting, he dragged them across the smithy and stood with them in front of Loki.

“What about that ring?” said Loki, pointing at the dwarf’s closed right hand. “I saw you hide it.”

red gold ringAndvari shook his head.
“Put it in the sack,” said Loki.
“Let me keep it,” begged Andvari. “Just this ring.”
“Put it in the sack,” said Loki.
“Let me keep this, just this,” pleaded the dwarf. “Then at least I’ll be able to make more gold again.”

“I have no need of more,” said Loki, “and I’m going to strip you to the bone.” He stepped forward and, knocking aside one sack, forced open Andvari’s fist and seized the little twisted ring. It was marvelously wrought and Loki slipped it on to his own little finger. “What is not freely given must be taken by force,” he said.
“Nothing was freely given,” Andvari replied.

Loki shouldered the sacks and turned towards the door of the smithy.
“Take that ring!” yelled the dwarf. “My curse on that ring and that gold! It will destroy whoever owns it.”
Loki turned round and faced Andvari. “So much the better,” he said.
“No one will win joy with my wealth,” shouted Andvari.
“If,” said Loki, “if I repeat your words to those about to get this gold, then, Andvari, your curse will come to pass.” And with that, Loki turned round again and, with oaths and spells in his ears, made his way out of the world of the dark elves and into Midgard.

* * *

“You took your time,” said Odin. Honir said nothing; he looked rather fearful.

“Hard won and well won,” said Loki. He dumped the sacks of red gold in front of his companions. “And what do you say to this?” he whispered, showing Odin the twisted finger-ring which he had wrenched from Andvari.

Odin blinked, and marveled at its subtle beauty. “Give it to me,” he said.

“At last,” said Hreidmar as be walked into the room, followed by his two sons and two daughters. He nodded, and Fafnir and Regin cut Odin and Honir free from their bonds.

Slowly and stiffly the two gods stood up. They flexed their muscles, they rubbed their hands together, they looked at their chafed wrists and ankles.

“Well then?” said Hreidmar.
“You must stuff the skin yourself,” said Loki, “or you’ll never be satisfied.” He emptied one sack on to the ground and the magician stowed piece after piece inside Otter’s skin. He filled it so that it was plump and taut, bursting from top to tail.

“Now we’ll cover it completely,” Loki said, opening the second sack and pouring another mound of metal over the marl floor. While Honir held Otter’s skin upright, snout down, Odin and Loki heaped the gold around it. They built Otter a barrow of gold.

“So,” said Odin, with the satisfaction of a job well done, “come and look for yourself, Hreidmar! We’ve covered the skin completely.”

“The magician walked round and round the stack. He walked round it again. He examined the gold inch by inch. “Here!” he said. “Here’s a whisker! This must be covered and hidden. Otherwise, I’ll hold that you’ve broken your oath – and that will be the end of our understanding.”

Loki looked at Odin and Odin looked at the twisted ring on his little finger. He sniffed and drew it off and placed it over the single whisker showing. “Now,” said Odin loudly, “we’ve paid Otter’s ransom in full.”
“You have indeed,” said Hreidmar.

Still rather unsteady on his feet, Odin lurched across the room to where his spear Gungnir was propped up in the corner. And Loki fell on his sky-shoes and at once put them on. A sense of their own strength surged within them. They looked at Hreidmar and Fafnir and Regin with no great liking.

“Listen carefully!” said Loki. “That ring and all that gold was made by the dwarf Andvari. I only wrested it from him with his curse. “Loki paused. “And what he said I say; what he said will hold.” Loki’s voice was low and compelling. “Take that ring! My curse on that ring and that gold! It will destroy whosoever owns it.”

Odin looked at Loki. His eye glittered and Loki smiled crookedly. Then Honir took one step and was at their side. The three companions stepped out of the farmhouse into the welcoming spring air.

(via siege-loki-problems)

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Siegfried : a romance founded on Wagner's operas, Rheingold, Siegfried and Gotterdämmerung' by S. Baring-Gould; illustrated by Charles Robinson. Published 1904 by Dean & Son, London.

Source

(via poupon)

vlkingdeathmarch:

schaudwen:

lokabrenna:


lokisergi:


lokabrenna:


lokisfriunt:


lokeanconcubine:


schaudwen:


Skadi and Scarlip
Loki’s scar’s came out a bit of a mess in this, but I’m glad his hobo fabulous worked out so well ( Guy has no hall that he calls his own, so I figured I’d make him be the god that wears everything he owns, and then sleeps on the couch of whomever is throwing a mead party this week. Loki, you are the god of moochers, you don’t even own your own feather cloak, com’on.)
Skadi… I’m mostly happy with. There’s a similarity to their their dress and look that I wouldn’t have echoed in an aesir, and for coming up with that look an the fly, I’m not too dissapointed. Skadi’s definitely the power flip side to Loki’s guile, but he seems to think the situation’s under control. For now.





YES PLEASE


I think Skaði is a little too masculine here, and Loki perhaps slightly too feminine, but I LOVE Loki’s mouth and eyes and hand. Their clothing designs are also super cool. I might feel differently about this if it were in colour.


Schaudwen - Reblogging from my Loki acct.
First off, I’m glad you like the pic! I am tempted to color it, but I admit that is not my strong point, so I don’t usually color things. And as for the clothing, I liked it so much I’m working on another Loki pic just to I could figure out more of his outfit.
Teal deer warnings (And also for mentioning negative outcomes of social gender constructs, which arguably exist in norse myth context, but aren’t my own philosophy.)
And now onto Skadi, Loki and gender presentation.
The depiction of Loki and Skadi in their respective masculine and feminine gender presentation was deliberate. I was discussing this with another person, but you are correct in noting that Skadi is generally depicted as very feminine. In fact, she often is depicted with very little in common her Jotunn identity (I’ve even seen prints that depict her husband Njord as being twice her size… which is laughable, since he’s Vanir, and she’s Aesir, and wow, it certainly is interesting how 18th century prints depicther as agiant before her marriage, while the prints after her marriage depict her as being the same size or smaller than her husband, and boy is it hard not to get on an off topic rant there…)
Due to the key point in Skadi’s mythology, that she was a Jotun who was willing to don ‘helm and birnie and all weapons of war’ to avenger her father, I think its a fair assessment that she was a masculine figure, even when compared to other female jotnar. Like Loki, I feel that Skadi is a figure that transgresses gender boundaries. However, Skadi is not as (negatively) recognized for this, because her gender performance isn’t as obvious as Loki, who will literally be transformed into a female (His multiple transformations into giantess’, Odin’s reference to Loki living as a woman and bearing children in the Lokasenna, the ‘mare’ incident), and being willing to be on the receptive partner, which was Ergi and not manly for a man to endure by norse standards.
Despite Skadi’s gender performance not leading to as negative a result as Loki’s gender transformations do (either in association with his acts of ergi in those forms, or in association with his actions, such as damning Balder to Hel), I think that the fact that the result of Skadi’s gender transgression is not happiness bolsters the idea that she did in fact transgress a boundary held by the society (Men would offer suit, and it was up to a daughter to accept or not). Though Skadi is able to use the threat of war to negotiate that she may choose her own husband, the handicap the Aesir put on her choice, to only choose using the men’s feet, meant that ultimately the choice she made was a foolish one that would lead to the unhappiness of both spouses.
This of course isn’t proof that Skadi is meant to cross gender boundaries, but I really like the idea that she, like Loki, trespasses these sort of gender norms, and is allowed to do so, because she is Jotun daughter of a powerful Jotun sorcerer, and is already stepping over all sorts of norms. They are both Jotun that have been adopted into the Aesir, and its just too fun to compare and contrast them both, considering how the myths that have survived and the world view of those who consume these myths seem to have attached such different contexts to the two gods.
So yeah, I’m happy with how Skadi turned out. And Loki? I don’t think Loki can ever be too much of any gender.


When you put it THAT way, it makes a lot more sense to me. Knowing that it was INTENTIONAL puts a new perspective on things. You are a fantastic artist and I love that you actually thought all this through! And that you know the plural of Jotun is Jotnar!  It was Skaði’s height and Loki’s mouth that tipped me off as to which was which - I could easily see either of them being both figures in some sense. And now I’m rambling but tl;dr good stuff.


Oh, now that you mention it, you have a point about it being hard to identify which is which at a glance unless you’re picking up on some sparingly used symbols of each. I did try to include some of the spiral motifs that you’ll see associated with Loki, since I wasn’t willing to give him a curly mustache as per the loki hearth stone (adding both a mustache and scars would have made his mouth look like a mess). And hey, like I said - plenty of artists aren’t making a point of depicting Skadi like a Jotun, so having her tower over Loki is a bit different than what you’ll usually see.
And yeah, I think WAY too much about the stuff I am drawing. Basically by the time I was done with this, I had already mentally planned out an entire hate-fic based on his her unhappiness in Naotun with Njord and Loki mentioning her indiscretions in the Lokasenna. Now if only I would actually WRITE it.
Also, again, sorry for the long write up. It was basically me coalescing a bunch of ideas I’ve have for DAYS on Skadi, the representations of Jotun-As, and Loki and Skadi’s gender, which I just never got around to making its own post for. I was basically looking for any excuse to write it.

^^ Oh wow that is probably the best interpretation I’ve seen of either of them to be honest. I was honestly reading the interpretation and half way through I got really excited and almost reblogged without completing it, it’s wonderful. Damn it I have so much to say but you’ve basically covered it all and I’m just bless you and I think this is probably the best drawing I’ve seen and will be my favorite character representations of the two individuals.  

John Lindow’s ‘Norse Mythology: A guide to the Gods, Heroes, Rituals, and Beliefs’ had a great write up on Njord and Skadi’s gender performance in the myth of their marriage.


Here’s some excerpts (Sorry there’s no read more option)
NJÖRD
Skaldskaparmal continues with the aftermath. Thjazi’s daughter Skadi puts on armor and sets off to demand compensation. In Asgard she agrees to accept a husband from among the gods as compensation, and the gods offer her a choice based on the lower legs alone (Old Icelandic fotr, the term used, actually denoted the foot or the foot and leg). Seeing a particularly nice pair, she says, “I choose this one; there can be little ugly about Baldr,” but she has chosen Njord. Her final condition is that the gods should make her laugh, and Loki succeeds in doing so by tying a rope about his testicles and the beard of a she-goat and then, while each brays, falling onto Skadi’s lap.
Most observers assign the story as a whole to Loki’s dossier, for he is the only constant. The play with castration and inverted sex roles is obvious; indeed, it runs throughout the story. Skadi puts on helm and armor and sets off in the role ordinarily taken by a male kinsman to obtain compensation or extract vengeance for the death of her father Thjazi, presumably as sole surviving heir.
Compensation in the form of a spouse ordinarily involves the giving of a bride, and it appears, then, that Njord has somehow been feminized, just as Skadi has put on men’s clothing and taken up a task ordinarily in the male realm. An analogue to the choice of spouse by lower legs may be in the scene in Kormaks saga in which Kormak first meets Steingerd, who will be the object of his desire throughout the saga. When her ankles peep forth from under her skirts, Kormak utters a verse indicating that he has fallen in love with her even though he does not know her. Reading this scene against the myth of Skadi’s choice of Njord would accord directly with the gender inversions there. It is also worth pointing out that the name “Skadi” is grammatically masculine.

vlkingdeathmarch:

schaudwen:

lokabrenna:

lokisergi:

lokabrenna:

lokisfriunt:

lokeanconcubine:

schaudwen:

Skadi and Scarlip

Loki’s scar’s came out a bit of a mess in this, but I’m glad his hobo fabulous worked out so well ( Guy has no hall that he calls his own, so I figured I’d make him be the god that wears everything he owns, and then sleeps on the couch of whomever is throwing a mead party this week. Loki, you are the god of moochers, you don’t even own your own feather cloak, com’on.)

Skadi… I’m mostly happy with. There’s a similarity to their their dress and look that I wouldn’t have echoed in an aesir, and for coming up with that look an the fly, I’m not too dissapointed. Skadi’s definitely the power flip side to Loki’s guile, but he seems to think the situation’s under control. For now.

image

YES PLEASE

I think Skaði is a little too masculine here, and Loki perhaps slightly too feminine, but I LOVE Loki’s mouth and eyes and hand. Their clothing designs are also super cool. I might feel differently about this if it were in colour.

Schaudwen - Reblogging from my Loki acct.

First off, I’m glad you like the pic! I am tempted to color it, but I admit that is not my strong point, so I don’t usually color things. And as for the clothing, I liked it so much I’m working on another Loki pic just to I could figure out more of his outfit.

Teal deer warnings (And also for mentioning negative outcomes of social gender constructs, which arguably exist in norse myth context, but aren’t my own philosophy.)

And now onto Skadi, Loki and gender presentation.

The depiction of Loki and Skadi in their respective masculine and feminine gender presentation was deliberate. I was discussing this with another person, but you are correct in noting that Skadi is generally depicted as very feminine. In fact, she often is depicted with very little in common her Jotunn identity (I’ve even seen prints that depict her husband Njord as being twice her size… which is laughable, since he’s Vanir, and she’s Aesir, and wow, it certainly is interesting how 18th century prints depicther as agiant before her marriage, while the prints after her marriage depict her as being the same size or smaller than her husband, and boy is it hard not to get on an off topic rant there…)

Due to the key point in Skadi’s mythology, that she was a Jotun who was willing to don ‘helm and birnie and all weapons of war’ to avenger her father, I think its a fair assessment that she was a masculine figure, even when compared to other female jotnar. Like Loki, I feel that Skadi is a figure that transgresses gender boundaries. However, Skadi is not as (negatively) recognized for this, because her gender performance isn’t as obvious as Loki, who will literally be transformed into a female (His multiple transformations into giantess’, Odin’s reference to Loki living as a woman and bearing children in the Lokasenna, the ‘mare’ incident), and being willing to be on the receptive partner, which was Ergi and not manly for a man to endure by norse standards.

Despite Skadi’s gender performance not leading to as negative a result as Loki’s gender transformations do (either in association with his acts of ergi in those forms, or in association with his actions, such as damning Balder to Hel), I think that the fact that the result of Skadi’s gender transgression is not happiness bolsters the idea that she did in fact transgress a boundary held by the society (Men would offer suit, and it was up to a daughter to accept or not). Though Skadi is able to use the threat of war to negotiate that she may choose her own husband, the handicap the Aesir put on her choice, to only choose using the men’s feet, meant that ultimately the choice she made was a foolish one that would lead to the unhappiness of both spouses.

This of course isn’t proof that Skadi is meant to cross gender boundaries, but I really like the idea that she, like Loki, trespasses these sort of gender norms, and is allowed to do so, because she is Jotun daughter of a powerful Jotun sorcerer, and is already stepping over all sorts of norms. They are both Jotun that have been adopted into the Aesir, and its just too fun to compare and contrast them both, considering how the myths that have survived and the world view of those who consume these myths seem to have attached such different contexts to the two gods.

So yeah, I’m happy with how Skadi turned out. And Loki? I don’t think Loki can ever be too much of any gender.

When you put it THAT way, it makes a lot more sense to me. Knowing that it was INTENTIONAL puts a new perspective on things. You are a fantastic artist and I love that you actually thought all this through! And that you know the plural of Jotun is Jotnar!  It was Skaði’s height and Loki’s mouth that tipped me off as to which was which - I could easily see either of them being both figures in some sense. And now I’m rambling but tl;dr good stuff.

Oh, now that you mention it, you have a point about it being hard to identify which is which at a glance unless you’re picking up on some sparingly used symbols of each. I did try to include some of the spiral motifs that you’ll see associated with Loki, since I wasn’t willing to give him a curly mustache as per the loki hearth stone (adding both a mustache and scars would have made his mouth look like a mess). And hey, like I said - plenty of artists aren’t making a point of depicting Skadi like a Jotun, so having her tower over Loki is a bit different than what you’ll usually see.

And yeah, I think WAY too much about the stuff I am drawing. Basically by the time I was done with this, I had already mentally planned out an entire hate-fic based on his her unhappiness in Naotun with Njord and Loki mentioning her indiscretions in the Lokasenna. Now if only I would actually WRITE it.

Also, again, sorry for the long write up. It was basically me coalescing a bunch of ideas I’ve have for DAYS on Skadi, the representations of Jotun-As, and Loki and Skadi’s gender, which I just never got around to making its own post for. I was basically looking for any excuse to write it.

^^ Oh wow that is probably the best interpretation I’ve seen of either of them to be honest. I was honestly reading the interpretation and half way through I got really excited and almost reblogged without completing it, it’s wonderful. Damn it I have so much to say but you’ve basically covered it all and I’m just bless you and I think this is probably the best drawing I’ve seen and will be my favorite character representations of the two individuals.  

John Lindow’s ‘Norse Mythology: A guide to the Gods, Heroes, Rituals, and Beliefs’ had a great write up on Njord and Skadi’s gender performance in the myth of their marriage.

Here’s some excerpts (Sorry there’s no read more option)

NJÖRD

Skaldskaparmal continues with the aftermath. Thjazi’s daughter Skadi puts on armor and sets off to demand compensation. In Asgard she agrees to accept a husband from among the gods as compensation, and the gods offer her a choice based on the lower legs alone (Old Icelandic fotr, the term used, actually denoted the foot or the foot and leg). Seeing a particularly nice pair, she says, “I choose this one; there can be little ugly about Baldr,” but she has chosen Njord. Her final condition is that the gods should make her laugh, and Loki succeeds in doing so by tying a rope about his testicles and the beard of a she-goat and then, while each brays, falling onto Skadi’s lap.

Most observers assign the story as a whole to Loki’s dossier, for he is the only constant. The play with castration and inverted sex roles is obvious; indeed, it runs throughout the story. Skadi puts on helm and armor and sets off in the role ordinarily taken by a male kinsman to obtain compensation or extract vengeance for the death of her father Thjazi, presumably as sole surviving heir.

Compensation in the form of a spouse ordinarily involves the giving of a bride, and it appears, then, that Njord has somehow been feminized, just as Skadi has put on men’s clothing and taken up a task ordinarily in the male realm. An analogue to the choice of spouse by lower legs may be in the scene in Kormaks saga in which Kormak first meets Steingerd, who will be the object of his desire throughout the saga. When her ankles peep forth from under her skirts, Kormak utters a verse indicating that he has fallen in love with her even though he does not know her. Reading this scene against the myth of Skadi’s choice of Njord would accord directly with the gender inversions there. It is also worth pointing out that the name “Skadi” is grammatically masculine.

(via vikingdeathmar)

(Source: medievalvisions, via umakoo)

umakoo:

Viking jewellery by Nationalmuseet - National Museum of Denmark on Flickr.